Traffic Accident FAQS

What does it mean to have a traffic accident case?

A traffic accident case generally means that you were injured in a motor vehicle accident and it was caused by someone else.

How does insurance come into play in a traffic accident case?

There are several insurance policy provisions which may come into play and it can jeopardize your case if the conditions of each provision is not properly followed. Part of our job is to help coordinate payment of your bills and to determine who is responsible to pay for your damages.

For example, the other person’s bodily injury coverage may pay for your pain and suffering and some of your out of pocket expenses and medical bills. Your own personal injury protection benefits may pay for part of your medical bills and lost wages. Your own collision coverage may pay for your property damage. The other person’s property damage may also afford coverage for your property damage. Your health insurance may also pay part of your medical bills, subject to getting reimbursed out of the settlement. The main point is that if you are not 100% sure of who pays for what damage, you should consult with a lawyer to help make sure the bills and expenses are properly handled.

Which insurance companies have you handled traffic accident cases against?

We’ve handled cases against many insurance companies who do business in Florida. These include State Farm, GEICO, MetLife, USAA, Progressive, Zurich, Gallagher Bassett, Liberty Mutual, Lincoln General, Allstate, GMAC, AAA, AIG and 21 st Century. These are just a few of the companies we’ve represented clients against.

What types of cases fall within the category of a “traffic accident”?

Here are some examples of traffic accident cases we’ve handled:

  • Client was sitting at a traffic light and a negligent driver rear-ended her car.
  • Client was making a turn on a green arrow when another driver ran a red light and slammed into his car.
  • Pedestrian was crossing the street when another car failed to slow down and struck her.
  • Client was driving a tractor trailer when another car merged into his lane and caused the truck to lose control.
  • Client was driving on interstate when another driver side swiped her vehicle and pushed her into a guardrail.
  • Client was driving through a green light when a careless driver failed to stop at a red light and t-boned her car.
  • Client was driving a scooter when another car hit him.
  • Client was a passenger in a taxi cab when the taxi rear ended another motor vehicle.
  • Client was a passenger in a friend’s car when the friend lost control and struck a van.
How long do I typically have to make a claim for a car accident in Florida?

Florida law generally limits the time you can file a claim for injuries from a traffic accident to four years, or two years for a wrongful death. However, the time could be shorter. For example, if the traffic accident was caused by a government employee, they may have to be put on notice within 3 years from the incident date in order to preserve the right to file a lawsuit. Every case is fact specific and it is important to talk to an attorney as soon as possible to see if you can bring a claim.

If I live outside of Florida but I was injured in a traffic accident in Florida, where should I get a lawyer?

A lawyer admitted to practice in Florida should be the person handling your traffic accident case. Florida law prohibits out of state lawyers from practicing law in Florida unless certain specific requirements are met. Our office represents many families who live outside of Florida. We can easily communicate with you via email, telephone, fax or snail mail. In general, you may not even have to come back to Florida for your case depending on the type of case.

How do you get paid? Do I have to pay you anything up front or out of pocket?

We work on a contingency fee and it does not cost you anything out of pocket for our work on your case. We only get paid if you recover money for what happened. If for some reason there was no recovery, we waive all fees and costs.